RnRMarketResearch

US Defense Industry - Market Opportunities and Entry Strategies, Analyses and Forecasts to 2017

US aiming to reduce the defense expenditure by US$34.7 billion during 2012-2017

 
Repost This

Dallas, TX -- (SBWIRE) -- 09/17/2012 -- RnRMarketResearch.com adds " US defense Industry Market Opportunities and Entry Strategies, Analyses and Forecasts to 2017 " to its store. This report offers the reader an insight into the market opportunities and entry strategies adopted by foreign original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) to gain market share in the US defense industry.

What is the current market landscape and what is changing?
With the US defense budget for 2012 valued at US$645.7 billion, the nation has the largest defense market in the world. Due to its high levels of military spending, a large number of opportunities are available to companies keen to supply the nation with defense equipment. However, the US defense budget, which declined at a CAGR of -0.77% during the review period, is expected to record a CAGR of -0.12% over the forecast period, largely due to the financial constraints caused by the global financial crisis.

What are the key drivers behind recent market changes?
Threats from North Korea and Iran, modernization initiatives, an arms race with China and Russia, ongoing military operations, and the protection of allies are expected to drive the defense spending of the US. The US perceives a potential nuclear threat from Iran and North Korea, through their acquisition of long-range ballistic missiles. The tension between the US and North Korea further increased in November 2010, when the US criticized the attacks carried out by North Korea on South Korea.

What makes this report unique and essential to read?
The US Defense Industry Market Opportunities and Entry Strategies, Analyses and Forecasts to 2017provides detailed analysis of the current industry size and growth expectations from 2013to 2017, including highlights of key growth stimulators. It also benchmarks the industry against key global markets and provides a detailed understanding of emerging opportunities in specific areas.

Key Features and Benefits
The report provides detailed analysis of the current industry size and growth expectations from 2013to 2017, including highlights of key growth stimulators. It also benchmarks the industry against key global markets and provides a detailed understanding of emerging opportunities in specific areas.

The report includes trend analysis of imports and exports, together with their implications and impact on the US defense industry.

The report covers five forces analysis to identify various power centers in the industry and how these are expected to develop in the future.

The report allows readers to identify possible ways to enter the market, together with detailed descriptions of how existing companies have entered the market, including key contracts, alliances, and strategic initiatives.

The report helps the reader to understand the competitive landscape of the defense industry in the US. It provides an overview of key defense companies, both domestic and foreign, together with insights such as key alliances, strategic initiatives, and a brief financial analysis.

Key Market Issues
The US must modernize its aging fleet of equipment, such as fighter aircraft, helicopters, land defense systems, and maritime equipment; however, the rising unit cost of defense systems poses a challenge to procurement funding. The cost of military hardware is increasing due to technological advancements and a shortage of skilled labor in the design, engineering, and manufacturing sectors, coupled with the rising cost of input materials, such as metal. In addition, the per-unit overhead costs at production facilities increased due to a reduction in the number of units manufactured.

US defense expenditure is expected to decrease from 4.1% of GDP in 2012 to 3.1% of GDP by 2017, despite the engagement of the country’s troops in missions in Afghanistan and many other countries worldwide. Overall, the country’s defense expenditure is forecast to decrease from US$645.7 billion in 2012 to US$611.0 billion in 2017, leading to a reduction in procurement funding. Such a reduction has had a negative impact on a number of defense projects, and has resulted in delays and cancellations.

With the US aiming to reduce the defense expenditure by US$34.7 billion during 2012-2017, and rising personnel and health costs, the country’s capital expenditure on defense is anticipated to decrease. Furthermore, the government is encouraging companies throughout the defense market to increase the efficiency of the organizations and sell unprofitable units. As a result, defense companies will be compelled to take greater risks and accept lower profits on the limited number of available government contracts. Due to a combination of the above factors, unemployment is expected to increase, negotiations with suppliers and customers will become tense, and efforts to reduce expenses will increase across the board.

Key Highlights
The US defense budget declined at a CAGR of -0.77% during the review period, to reach a value of US$645.7 billion in 2012. However, defense expenditure is expected to register a marginal decline of -0.12% in CAGR over the forecast period, declining to US$611.0 billion by 2017. Indeed, the government has announced defense budget cuts over the next five years, which will be achieved by reducing capital expenditure.

The US homeland security budget is expected to value US$59.9 billion in 2012, and registered a CAGR of 6.25% during the review period. However, it is expected to register a CAGR of 1.91% over the forecast period and to reach US$63.7 billion in 2017. Expenditure on homeland security in the US will be driven by factors such as terrorism, organized crime, and illegal immigration. With the government focused on protecting the nation from both man-made and natural disasters, key growth opportunities are expected to emerge in the aviation and border security market, particularly equipment relating to critical infrastructure protection.

Despite the impact of the global financial crisis, which led to military budget cuts across the world, US defense exports continued to increase in 2011. As a consequence of its highly developed domestic defense industry, the country emerged as the largest arms exporter in the world. Furthermore, countries such as South Korea, Australia, and the UAE are dependent on the US for procuring advanced technology weapon systems such as fighter jets, missile defense systems, and armored vehicles. Over the forecast period the US will continue to be the largest arms exporter in the world, largely due to the increasing defense budgets of some of its major allies, such as South Korea, Israel, and Australia.”

Buy your copy of this report @ http://www.rnrmarketresearch.com/the-us-defense-industry-market-opportunities-and-entry-strategies-analyses-and-forecasts-to-2017-market-report.html .

List of Tables

Table 1: US Defense Expenditure (US$ Billion), 2008-2012
Table 2: US Defense Expenditure (US$ Billion), 2013-2017
Table 3: US GDP Growth vs. Defense Expenditure Growth vs. Defense Expenditure as Percentage of GDP, 2008-2012
Table 4: US GDP Growth vs. Defense Expenditure Growth and Defense Expenditure as Percentage of GDP Growth, 2013-2017
Table 5: US Per Capita Defense Expenditure, 2008-2012
Table 6: US Per Capita Defense Expenditure, 2013-2017
Table 7: US Defense Budget Split by Base Budget, OCO and Other Funds (US$ Billion), 2008-2012
Table 8: US Defense Budget Split by Base Budget, OCO and Other Funds (US$ Billion), 2013-2017
Table 9: US Defense Budget Split Between Capital and Revenue Expenditure (%), 2008-2012
Table 10: US Defense Budget Split Between Capital and Revenue Expenditure (%), 2013-2017
Table 11: US Defense Expenditure Allocation for Army, Air Force, Navy and Others (%), 2008-2012
Table 12: US Defense Expenditure Allocation for Army, Air Force, Navy and Others (%), 2013-2017
Table 13: US Defense Budget Allocation for Army (US$ billion), 2008-2012
Table 14: US Defense Budget Allocation for Army (US$ billion), 2013-2017
Table 15: US Defense Budget Allocation for Navy (US$ billion), 2008-2012
Table 16: US Defense Budget Allocation for Navy (US$ billion), 2013-2017
Table 17: US Defense Budget Allocation for Air Force (US$ billion), 2008-2012
Table 18: US Defense Budget Allocation for Air Force (US$ billion), 2013-2017
Table 19: US Defense Budget Allocation for Other Expenditure (US$ billion), 2008-2012
Table 20: US Defense Budget Allocation for Other Expenditure (US$ billion), 2013-2017
Table 21: US Homeland Security Expenditure (US$ billion), 2008-2012
Table 22: US Homeland Security Expenditure (US$ billion), 2013-2017
Table 23: Benchmarking with Key Markets - 2008-2012 vs. 2013-2017
Table 24: Top Twenty Global Arms Exporters*, 2008-2012
Table 25: Top Twenty Global Arms Importers*, 2008-2012
Table 26: US Defense Aircraft Projects, 2013
Table 27: US Defense Aircraft Projects, 2013
Table 28: US Defense Shipbuilding Projects Undertaken by the Department of Defense, 2013
Table 29: US Missile Defense Projects Undertaken by the Department of Defense, 2013
Table 30: US Munitions and Missile Projects Undertaken by the Department of Defense, 2013
Table 31: Lockheed Martin Corp - product focus
Table 32: Lockheed Martin Corp. - Alliances
Table 33: Lockheed Martin Corp. - Recent Contract Wins
Table 34: Raytheon - Product Focus
Table 35: Raytheon - Alliances
Table 36: Raytheon - Recent Contract Wins
Table 37: General Dynamics - product focus
Table 38: General Dynamics - Alliances
Table 39: General Dynamics - Recent Contract Wins
Table 40: Boeing - product focus
Table 41: Boeing - Alliances
Table 42: Boeing - Recent Contract Wins
Table 43: L-3 Communications Corp. - Product Focus
Table 44: L-3 Communications Corp. - Alliances
Table 45: L-3 Communications Corp. - Recent Contract Wins
Table 46: Northrop Grumman Corp.- Product Focus
Table 47: Northrop Grumman Corporation - Alliances
Table 48: Northrop Grumman Corp. - Recent Contract Wins
Table 49: Science Application International Corp. (SAIC) - Product Focus
Table 50: Science Application International Corp. (SAIC) - Alliances
Table 51: Science Application International Corp. (SAIC) - Recent Contract Wins
Table 52: Honeywell International Inc. - product focus
Table 53: Honeywell International Inc. - Alliances
Table 54: Honeywell International Inc - Recent Contract Wins
Table 55: Sikorsky Aircraft - Product Focus
Table 56: Sikorsky Aircraft - Alliances
Table 57: Sikorsky Aircraft - Recent Contract Wins
Table 58: General Electric Aviation - Product Focus
Table 59: General Electric Aviation - Alliances
Table 60: General Electric Aviation - Recent Contract Wins
Table 61: Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc - Product Focus
Table 62: Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc. - Alliances
Table 63: Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc. - Recent Contract Wins
Table 64: Textron Marine and Land Systems - Product Focus
Table 65: Textron Marine and Land Systems - Alliances
Table 66: Textron Marine and Land Systems - Recent Contract Wins

List of Figures

Figure 1: US Defense Expenditure (US$ Billion), 2008-2012
Figure 2: US Defense Expenditure (US$ Billion), 2013-2017
Figure 3: US GDP Growth vs. Defense Expenditure Growth vs. Defense Expenditure as Percentage of GDP, 2008-2012
Figure 4: US GDP Growth vs. Defense Expenditure Growth and Defense Expenditure as Percentage of GDP, 2013-2017
Figure 5: US Per Capita Defense Expenditure, 2008-2012
Figure 6: US Per Capita Defense Expenditure, 2013-2017
Figure 7: US Defense Budget Split by Base Budget, OCO and Other Funds (US$ Billion), 2008-2012
Figure 8: US Defense Budget Split by Base Budget, OCO and Other Funds (US$ Billion), 2013-2017
Figure 9: US Defense Budget Split Between Capital and Revenue Expenditure (%), 2008-2012
Figure 10: US Defense Budget Split Between Capital and Revenue Expenditure (%), 2013-2017
Figure 11: US Defense Expenditure Allocation for Army, Air Force, Navy and Others (%), 2008-2012
Figure 12: US Defense Expenditure Allocation for Army, Air Force, Navy and Others (%), 2013-2017
Figure 13: US Defense Budget Allocation for Army (US$ billion), 2008-2012
Figure 14: US Defense Budget Allocation for Army (US$ billion), 2013-2017
Figure 15: US Defense Budget Allocation for Navy (US$ billion), 2008-2012
Figure 16: US Defense Budget Allocation for Navy (US$ billion), 2013-2017
Figure 17: US Defense Budget Allocation for Air Force (US$ billion), 2008-2012
Figure 18: US Defense Budget Allocation for Air Force (US$ billion), 2013-2017
Figure 19: US Defense Budget Allocation for Other Expenditure (US$ billion), 2008-2012
Figure 20: US Defense Budget Allocation for Other Expenditure (US$ billion), 2013-2017
Figure 21: US Homeland Security Expenditure (US$ billion), 2008-2012
Figure 22: US Homeland Security Expenditure (US$ billion), 2013-2017
Figure 23: SDI Terrorism Heat Map, 2011
Figure 24: SDI Terrorism Index, 2011
Figure 25: Benchmarking with Key Markets - 2007-2011 vs. 2012-2016
Figure 26: Defense Expenditure of the World's Largest Military Spenders (US$ Billion), 2012 and 2017
Figure 27: Defense Expenditure as a Percentage of GDP of Largest Military Spenders (%), 2012
Figure 28: Investments in Command, Control, Communications and Computers Systems (US$ billion), 2013
Figure 29: Funding for Joint Tactical Radio System (US$ Million), 2011-2013
Figure 30: Funding for WIN-T (US$ million), 2011-2013
Figure 31: Key Focus Areas: Investments in Air Force Modernization (US$ billion), 2013
Figure 32: Funding for KC-46A New Tanker (US$ million), 2011-2013
Figure 33: Funding for C-130J Hercules (US$ Million), 2011-2013
Figure 34: Funding for F-35 Joint Strike Force Program (US$ billion), 2011-2013
Figure 35: Funding for V-22 Osprey (US$ million), 2011-2013
Figure 36: Funding for MQ-1 Predator/MQ-9 Reaper (US$ million), 2011-2013
Figure 37: Funding for RQ-4 Global Hawk Systems (US$ million), 2011-2013
Figure 38: Funding for RQ-7 Shadow/ RQ-11 Raven Systems (US$ million), 2011-2013
Figure 39: Funding for AH-64 D Longbow Block 3 (US$ million), 2011-2013
Figure 40: Funding for CH-47 Chinook (US$ million), 2011-2013
Figure 41: Funding for Light Utility Helicopters (US$ million), 2011-2013
Figure 42: Funding for UH-60 Black Hawk (US$ Million), 2011-2013
Figure 43: Funding for HH-60M Pave Hawk (US$ million), 2011-2013
Figure 44: Funding for E-2D Advanced Hawkeye (US$ Million), 2011-2013
Figure 45: Funding for F/A-18E/F Super Hornet (US$ million), 2011-2013
Figure 46: Funding for EA-18G Growler (US$ million), 2011-2013
Figure 47: Funding for H-1 Huey/Super Cobra (US$ million), 2011-2013
Figure 48: Funding for MH-60S Fleet Combat Support Helicopter (US$ million), 2011-2013
Figure 49: Funding for P-8A Poseidon (US$ billion), 2011-2013
Figure 50: Key Focus Areas: Investments in Ground Vehicles (US$ billion), 2013
Figure 51: Funding for Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (US$ million), 2011-2013
Figure 52: Funding for FHTVs (US$ million), 2011-2013
Figure 53: Funding for FMTVs (US$ million), 2011-2013
Figure 54: Funding for M-I Abrams Tank Upgrade (US$ million), 2011-2013
Figure 55: Funding for Stryker Family of Armored Vehicles (US$ million), 2011-2013
Figure 56: Key Focus Areas: Investments in Shipbuilding and Maritime Systems (US$ billion), 2013
Figure 57: Funding for Littoral Combat Ship (US$ billion), 2011-2013
Figure 58: Funding for CVN 21 Carrier Replacement (US$ million), 2011-2013
Figure 59: Funding for Joint High Speed Vessel (US$ million), 2011-2013
Figure 60: Funding for DDG 51 Aegis Destroyer (US$ billion), 2011-2013
Figure 61: Funding for SSN 774 Virginia-Class Submarine (US$ billion), 2011-2013
Figure 62: Funding for CVN Refueling Complex Overhaul Program (US$ million), 2011-2013
Figure 63: Key Focus Areas: Investments in Missile Defense Systems (US$ billion), 2013
Figure 64: Key Focus Areas: Investments in Munitions and Missiles (US$ billion), 2013
Figure 65: US Defense Import Trend (US$ Million), 2007-2011
Figure 66: US Defense Imports by Country (%), 2007-2011
Figure 67: US Defense Imports by Category (%), 2007-2011
Figure 68: US Defense exports (US$ Million), 2007-2011
Figure 69: US Defense Exports by Country (%), 2007-2011
Figure 70: US Defense Exports by Category (%), 2007-2011
Figure 71: Industry Dynamics - Porter's Five Forces Analysis
Figure 72: Lockheed Martin Corp. - Revenue Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2007-2011
Figure 73: Lockheed Martin Corp. - Operating Profit Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2007-2011
Figure 74: Lockheed Martin Corp. - Net Profit Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2007-2011
Figure 75: Raytheon - Revenue Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2007-2011
Figure 76: Raytheon - Operating Profit Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2007-2011
Figure 77: Raytheon - Net Profit Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2007-2011
Figure 78: General Dynamics - Revenue Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2007-2011
Figure 79: General Dynamics - Operating Profit Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2007-2011
Figure 80: General Dynamics - Net Profit Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2007-2011
Figure 81: Boeing - Revenue Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2007-2011
Figure 82: Boeing - Operating Profit Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2007-2011
Figure 83: Boeing - Net Profit Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2007-2011
Figure 84: L-3 Communications Corp. - Revenue Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2007-2011
Figure 85: L-3 Communications Corp. - Operating Profit Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2007-2011
Figure 86: L-3 Communications Corp. - Net Profit Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2007-2011
Figure 87: Northrop Grumman Corp. - Revenue Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2007-2011
Figure 88: Northrop Grumman Corp. - Operating Profit Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2007-2011
Figure 89: Northrop Grumman Corp. - Net Profit Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2007-2011
Figure 90: Science Application International Corp. (SAIC) - Revenue Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2008-2012
Figure 91: Science Application International Corp. (SAIC) - Operating Profit Trend Analysis (US$ million), 2008-2012
Figure 92: Science Application International Corp. (SAIC) - Net Profit Trend Analysis (US$ million), 2008-2012
Figure 93: Honeywell International Inc. - Revenue Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2007-2011
Figure 94: Honeywell International Inc. - Operating Profit Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2007-2011
Figure 95: Honeywell International Inc. - Net Profit Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2007-2011
Figure 96: US Population - Female (In Millions), 2008-2017
Figure 97: US Population - Male (In Millions), 2008-2017
Figure 98: US Construction Output, Current Prices, US Dollars (In Billions), 2001-2010
Figure 99: US Current Account Balance as Percentage of GDP, 2008-2017
Figure 100: US Exports of goods and services, current prices (US$ Billion), 2001- 2010
Figure 101: US Fiscal Balance as a percentage of GDP, 2001-2010
Figure 102: US Foreign Direct Investment(US$ Billion), 2001-2010
Figure 103: US GDP at Purchasing Power Parity (US$ Billion), 2006-2015
Figure 104: US GDP at Constant Prices(US$ Billion), 2006-2015
Figure 105: US GDP at Current Prices(US$ Billion), 2006-2015
Figure 106: US General Government Final Consumption Expenditure (US$ Billion), 2001-2010
Figure 107: US Gross Fixed Capital Formation, Current Prices(US$ Billion), 2001-2010
Figure 108: US Imports of goods and services (current US$ Billion), 2001-2010
Figure 109: US Interest rate(Lending), 2001-2010
Figure 110: US Manufacturing Output, Current Prices (US$ Billion), 2001-2010
Figure 111: US Market cap of NASDAQ OMX Stock Exchange (US$ mn), 2001-2010
Figure 112: US Wholesale Price Index, 2000-2009
Figure 113: US Crude Oil Distillation Capacity (Thousand Barrels Per Cal Day), 2000-2009
Figure 114: US Electricity Installed Capacity (Million Kilowatts), 2000-2009
Figure 115: US Hydroelectricity Installed Capacity (Million Kilowatts), 2000-2009
Figure 116: US Natural Gas Consumption (Billion Cubic Feet), 2001-2010
Figure 117: US Natural Gas Imports (Billion Cubic Feet), 2001-2010
Figure 118: US Net Conventional Thermal Electricity Generation(Billion Kwh), 2001-2010
Figure 119: US Net Geothermal, Solar, Wind, and Wood Electric Power Generation (Billion Kwh), 2001-2010
Figure 120: US Net Hydroelectric Power Generation (Billion Kilowatt hours), 2001-2010
Figure 121: US Petroleum Consumption (Thousand Barrels Per Day), 2002-2011
Figure 122: US Petroleum Production (Thousand Barrels Per Day), 2002-2011
Figure 123: US Coal Consumption (Million Short Tons), 2001-2010
Figure 124: US Coal Production (Million Short Tons), 2001-2010
Figure 125: US Political Stability Index, 2002-2010
Figure 126: US Fixed Broadband Internet Subscribers (Thousands), 2001-2010
Figure 127: Patents Granted, 2002-2011
Figure 128: Software Patents, 2006-2011

Contact sales@rnrmarketresearch.com for further information.