Emilie Ringe

Electron Microscopy Group Proudly Announces Dr. Emilie Ringe's Research and Recent Publications

 
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Vancover, BC -- (SBWIRE) -- 06/23/2014 -- Empowered by the Royal Society’s Newton International Research Fellowship, Dr. Emilie Ringe is a dedicated Gott Junior Research Fellow at Trinity Hall. She is also a part of the Electron Microscopy Group in the Material Science and Metallurgy Department at Cambridge University that proudly displays all her research works and publications on its official website.

Dr. Ringe completed her Ph.D. from Northwestern University during which she worked on the thesis titled ‘Building the Nanoplasmonics Toolbox through Shape Modeling and Single Particle Optical Studies’. The thesis is a detailed account of new statistical approaches deciphering the correlation between plasmonic behaviour and particle morphology in Ag and Au (noble metal particles). The research work of Dr. Emily Ringe also includes development of new analytical models aimed to envisage the shape of small alloy and kinetically grown nanoparticles and small alloys. With strong research skills providing more and more knowledge in the field of material science and Nano engineering, Dr. Ringe actively attends and participates in international conferences and in 2012 she also organized the first Gordon Research Seminar on noble metal nanoparticles.

In addition to this, Dr. Emilie Ringe was also actively involved in science-based outreach aimed at school children during her Ph.D. years. When she is not engrossed with her academic endeavours, she likes to run and since 2009 she has been receiving training alongside blind athletes.

The website states, “Before joining the Ph.D. program, Emilie finished her B.A. and completed a M.S. at Northwestern University, after a transfer from McGill University. Her M.S. thesis, entitled ‘Structure Determination and Characterization of UCuOP, UCu0.6Sb2 and UFeSe3, Three Uranium Compounds Containing a First Row Transition Metal’ explored the synthesis, crystallography, and conductivity of uranium compounds with an aim at better understanding 3d/5f electron interactions. Emilie also worked outside of academia for 16 months as a formulation researcher at the pharmaceutical company Merck Frosst, during her B.Sc. studies at McGill University.”

Atomic resolution and three dimensional elemental mapping of alloy nanoparticles relevant for catalysis applications are the current area of interests of Dr. Ringe. An all-inclusive list of Dr. Emily Ringe’s research work and publications can be viewed at http://www-hrem.msm.cam.ac.uk/people/ringe/index.shtml.

About Emilie Ringe
Emilie Ringe is a Gott Junior Research Fellow at Trinity Hall and also holds a Newton International Research Fellowship from the Royal Society. She is based in the Electron Microscopy group in the Materials Science and Metallurgy Department at Cambridge University. She was a Ph.D. student at Northwestern University where she held a Presidential Fellowship. Her thesis entitled “Building the Nanoplasmonics Toolbox through Shape Modeling and Single Particle Optical Studies”. Emilie’s current interests include atomic resolution and three dimensional elemental mapping of alloy nanoparticles relevant for catalysis applications, as well as near-field Plasmon mapping using electron energy loss spectroscopy.

For more information, please visit http://www-hrem.msm.cam.ac.uk/people/ringe/index.shtml