Start Baking Your Own Bread and Reduce Preservative Intake in Your Diet

 
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Phoenix, AZ -- (SBWIRE) -- 04/14/2014 -- Bread making is a form of culinary art with origin that dates back to thousands of years. The idea of getting started with making ones own bread used to be intimidating. The old-fashioned way of bread making requires huge investment in terms of monetary and efforts. "The introduction of bread maker brings down the whole barrier and with few simple instructions, anyone can bake delicious bread," says Amanda. With more number of Americans increasingly in-charge of their health beings, reducing food high on additives and preservatives is the simplest logical first step anyone would be taking. But first impression always last. "Choose the wrong bread maker and you'll end up disappointed," added Amanda. Helping the health conscious find the perfect bread machine is what Amanda's recently launched BreadKitchenStory.Com site aims to do.

Thanks to recent nationwide campaign such as "Let's Move", a growing spotlight is placed on the health state of our nation. Obesity and other diet-related health issues are not new. These are issues that have been accumulating for years, in no small contributed by the mushrooming of junk food chains. One thing that gets Amanda most worried about is the presence of additives and preservatives in almost all the food sold on the store shelves.

The list of such food is endless but let's consider bread - one that is the main staple to millions of American household. For anyone who needs real evidence on the presence of preservatives inside those loaves of bread sold in stores, a small experiment is all it takes, provided one has access to a bread maker at home. Simply grab a loaf of bread that is freshly delivered for the day. Bring it home and bake your own bread. Leave both exposed to room temperature and condition. More likely than not, the loaf bought at the store will last longer than one that is freshly baked.

But one mistake that many bread maker buyers often make is to assume that every bread maker is the same and they can master their bread makers in an instant. Such lofty assumption leads many to disappointment with their purchases. Worse still, they stop using their machines only after few disappointing runs and found themselves back with the same old preservative-laden bread bought at the grocery stores.

"If only more bread maker buyers realize that it still takes many rounds of experiments to churn out best results from their machine, the dropout rate can be minimzed and more families will have access to healthier bread," says Amanda. It is also good to note that certain models come with fully automated fruit and nut dispenser. Such feature allows anyone to easily come up with their own recipes and does not get bored with the simple taste of plain bread.

Reducing preservative-laden food is one small step we all can do in order to improve our own health being. Bread, as the major food we consumed, is a good point to start. Automatic bread makers put the power back into our hands and getting started with our own homemade bread has never been easier. Nonetheless, there are several points that need to be carefully considered in making such purchase. Though these machines have taken most of the guesswork out of the equation, it still takes practice to make the perfect loaf.

To understand more about the different considerations that should go into the selection of good bread maker, visit BreadKitchenStory.Com

About BreadKitchenStory.Com
BreadKitchenStory.Com is a blog dedicated to provide easy to understand guide when it comes to the art of bread making and bread machine selection. As a bread lover who has to rely on her bread maker to produce fresh loaves every day, Amanda has been through hundreds of baking cycle and tried dozens of bread recipes. Visit her blog to learn how to learn more about this one form of culinary art.

Contact Info:
Name: Amanda Lewis
Email: amanda@breadkitchenstory.com
Company Location: Phoenix, Arizona
Website Address: http://breadkitchenstory.com